5950736590_c0f7fb83db

Toyota Land Cruiser History

The Toyota Land Cruiser is a series of four-wheel drive vehicles produced by the Japanese car maker Toyota. It is Toyota’s longest running series.

Production of the first generation Land Cruiser began in 1951 (90 units) as Toyota’s version of a Jeep-like vehicle. The Land Cruiser has been produced in convertible, hardtop, station wagon, and utility truck versions. The Land Cruiser’s reliability and longevity has led to huge popularity, especially in Australia where it is the best-selling body-on-frame, four-wheel drive vehicle. Toyota also extensively tests the Land Cruiser in the Australian outback – considered to be one of the toughest operating environments in both temperature and terrain.

Toyota Land Cruiser (40 series)
toyota land cruiser 1951
Image by pedrosimoes7
Sintra, Portugal (Wikipedia)

The Toyota Land Cruiser is a popular series of four-wheel drive vehicles produced by the Japanese carmaker Toyota Motor Corporation. The Land Cruiser, along with the Hilux utility, has been used in the world’s most grueling terrains and climates. Design of the Land Cruiser began in 1951 as a Toyota Jeep-like vehicle and production began in 1954. The Land Cruiser has been produced in many different versions such as the convertible, hardtop, station wagon and utility. In many places, the term Land Cruiser has even become a generic term for an off-road vehicle.

40 Series (1960–1984)
Third generation – 40 Series

Production1970-1983
AssemblyARACO
Yoshiwara,Aichi, Japan
Body style(s)2-door Softtop
2-door Hardtop
2-door pickup truck
4-door Station Wagon
LayoutFR layout

1981 Land Cruiser Troop Carrier
1960 – The 20 Series was upgraded to the now classic 40. Toyota made many production changes by buying new steel presses. Mechanically, the FJ40 was given a new 125 hp, 3.9 liter F engine and the Land Cruiser finally received low-range gearing. The Brazilian model was rebadged the Bandeirante and received a Mercedes-Benz built Diesel engine generating 78 hp.
1965 – Global production surpassed 50,000 vehicles. The Land Cruiser was the best selling Toyota in the United States.
1968 – The 100,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide.
1972 – The 200,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide.
1973 – The 300,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide. The first diesel Land Cruiser was introduced for export on long wheelbase models and it had a six-cylinder H engine.
1974 – A four-cylinder 3.0-liter B diesel was offered. The introduction of this engine boosted sales in Japan by putting the Land Cruiser in a lower tax compact Freight-car category than it’s 3.9-liter gasoline version. Note: the new B diesel engine was different to the B gasoline engine used in the original BJ.
1975 – The 3.9-liter gasoline engine was replaced by a larger, more powerful 4.2-liter 2F unit. The FJ55 received front disc brakes.
1976 – United States-version FJ40 Land Cruisers received front disc brakes like the FJ55. The Toyota Land Cruiser Association was founded in California.
1977 – The Irish Army took delivery of the first of 77 FJ45 Land Cruisers. Although fast, reliable and with good off-road performance the type tended to rust excessively in the wet Irish climate. A few which did not succumb to the effects of weather were repainted in gloss olive green and survive as ceremonial gun tractors at military funerals.
1978 – The first BJ / FJ40 and FJ55 models were officially sold in Germany with both diesel (BJ40) petrol engines (FJ40 /55).
1979 – United States-version FJ40’s were updated this year with a new wider, square bezel surrounding the headlights. Power steering and cooler were offered in FJ40s for the first time. The diesel engine was improved, evolving into the 3.2-liter 2B only in Japan.

Blue Mountains, 4×4 Toyota Land Cruiser, NSW
toyota land cruiser 1951
Image by BRJ INC.

Blue Mountains, 4×4 Toyota Land Cruiser, NSW
toyota land cruiser 1951
Image by BRJ INC.

 

Blue Mountains, 4×4 Toyota Land Cruiser, NSW
toyota land cruiser 1951
Image by BRJ INC.

1977 Toyota Landcruiser FJ45 Wagon
toyota land cruiser 1951
Image by Sicnag
The Land Cruiser is a 4wd vehicle that has been built by Toyota since 1951.
The 1st was the 1951-55 BJ, a 2 door softtop with 3.4l 6 cyl diesel engine.
The 2nd generation was the more stylish 1955-60 20 Series. Now available in 2 door softtop and hardtop, 4 door wagon and pickup. Still no low range tho, 3.4 or 3.9l petrol 6 cyl.
This, the 1960-84 3rd generation 40 Series, now with a new body and low range, same body options and same engines as the 20 Series. The short wheelbase was the FJ40 (soft top and light van model), the middle wheelbase FJ43, and the long wheelbase FJ45 replaced in 1967 by the FJ55
A facelift in 1973 saw new door handles and large indicators were introduced on the fenders. A 3.0l Diesel engine was available in 1974, the petrol was up to 4.2 in 1975 and a 4.0l diesel in 1980

 

Toyota Land Cruiser (40 series)
toyota land cruiser BJ
Image by pedrosimoes7
Sintra, Portugal (Wikipedia)

The Toyota Land Cruiser is a popular series of four-wheel drive vehicles produced by the Japanese carmaker Toyota Motor Corporation. The Land Cruiser, along with the Hilux utility, has been used in the world’s most grueling terrains and climates. Design of the Land Cruiser began in 1951 as a Toyota Jeep-like vehicle and production began in 1954. The Land Cruiser has been produced in many different versions such as the convertible, hardtop, station wagon and utility. In many places, the term Land Cruiser has even become a generic term for an off-road vehicle.

40 Series (1960–1984)
Third generation – 40 Series

Production1970-1983
AssemblyARACO
Yoshiwara,Aichi, Japan
Body style(s)2-door Softtop
2-door Hardtop
2-door pickup truck
4-door Station Wagon
LayoutFR layout

1981 Land Cruiser Troop Carrier
1960 – The 20 Series was upgraded to the now classic 40. Toyota made many production changes by buying new steel presses. Mechanically, the FJ40 was given a new 125 hp, 3.9 liter F engine and the Land Cruiser finally received low-range gearing. The Brazilian model was rebadged the Bandeirante and received a Mercedes-Benz built Diesel engine generating 78 hp.
1965 – Global production surpassed 50,000 vehicles. The Land Cruiser was the best selling Toyota in the United States.
1968 – The 100,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide.
1972 – The 200,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide.
1973 – The 300,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide. The first diesel Land Cruiser was introduced for export on long wheelbase models and it had a six-cylinder H engine.
1974 – A four-cylinder 3.0-liter B diesel was offered. The introduction of this engine boosted sales in Japan by putting the Land Cruiser in a lower tax compact Freight-car category than it’s 3.9-liter gasoline version. Note: the new B diesel engine was different to the B gasoline engine used in the original BJ.
1975 – The 3.9-liter gasoline engine was replaced by a larger, more powerful 4.2-liter 2F unit. The FJ55 received front disc brakes.
1976 – United States-version FJ40 Land Cruisers received front disc brakes like the FJ55. The Toyota Land Cruiser Association was founded in California.
1977 – The Irish Army took delivery of the first of 77 FJ45 Land Cruisers. Although fast, reliable and with good off-road performance the type tended to rust excessively in the wet Irish climate. A few which did not succumb to the effects of weather were repainted in gloss olive green and survive as ceremonial gun tractors at military funerals.
1978 – The first BJ / FJ40 and FJ55 models were officially sold in Germany with both diesel (BJ40) petrol engines (FJ40 /55).
1979 – United States-version FJ40’s were updated this year with a new wider, square bezel surrounding the headlights. Power steering and cooler were offered in FJ40s for the first time. The diesel engine was improved, evolving into the 3.2-liter 2B only in Japan.

Land Cruiser 60
toyota land cruiser BJ
Image by Toyota UK
The Toyota Land Cruiser is renowned the world over for its “go-anywhere” abilities. The Land Cruiser boasts an unbroken heritage stretching back over 60 years with sales of over five million.

BJ and FJ (1951–1955)

1950 – The Korean War created demand for a military light utility vehicle. The war put a Jeep on Japan’s doorstep. The United States government ordered 100 vehicles with the new Willys specs and Toyota was asked to build them.
1951 – The Toyota “Jeep” BJ prototype was developed in January 1951. This came from the demand for military-type utility vehicles, much like the British Land Rover Series 1 that appeared in 1948. The Jeep BJ was larger than the original U.S. Jeep and more powerful thanks to its Type B 3.4 L six-cylinder OHV Gasoline engine which generated 63 kW (86 PS; 84 hp) at 3600 rpm and 215 N·m (159 lb·ft) torque at 1600 rpm. It had a part-time four-wheel drive system like the Jeep. Unlike the Jeep, however, the Jeep BJ had no low-range transfer case.
1951 – In July 1951, Toyota’s test driver Ichiro Taira drove the next generation of the Jeep BJ prototype up to the sixth stage of Mount Fuji, the first vehicle to climb that high. The test was overseen by the National Police Agency (NPA). Impressed by this feat, the NPA quickly placed an order for 289 of these offroad vehicles, making the Jeep BJ their official patrol car.[8]
1953 – Regular production of the “Toyota Jeep BJ” began at Toyota Honsya Plant (Rolling chassis assembly), and body assembly and painting was done at Arakawa Bankin Kogyo KK, later known as ARACO (now an affiliate of Toyota Auto Body Co.).[8] The “Toyota Jeep BJ” Series was introduced alongside the following:
BJ-T (Touring),
BJ-R (Radio),
BJ-J (Cowl-chassis for a fire-engine).
1954 — The name “Land Cruiser” was created by the technical director Hanji Umehara. “In England we had another competitor — Land Rover. I had to come up with a name for our car that would not sound less dignified than those of our competitors. That is why I decided to call it ‘Land Cruiser’,” he recalls.[8] The name had already been used on the US Studebaker Land Cruiser car from 1934 to 1954.
1954 – The 93 kW (126 PS; 125 hp), 3.9 L Type F gasoline engine added for the fire-engine chassis. Models are renamed as:
BJ-T (Touring),
BJ-R (Radio),
BJ-J (Cowl-chassis for a fire-engine),
FJ-J (Cowl-chassis for a fire-engine).

 

1977 Toyota Landcruiser FJ45 Wagon
toyota land cruiser 1955
Image by Sicnag
1977 Toyota Landcruiser FJ40
toyota land cruiser 1955
Image by Sicnag

J20, J30 (1955–1960)

1955 – The Second generation, 20 Series was introduced. It was designed to have more civilian appeal than the BJ for export reasons. It also had more stylish bodywork and a better ride thanks to longer four-plate leaf springs which had been adapted from the Toyota Light Truck. It had a more powerful 135 PS (99 kW) 3.9 L six-cylinder Type F gasoline engine, but still only had a three speed gearbox. The interior of the vehicles were made more comfortable by moving the engine 120 mm (4.7 in) forward. The 20 Series still had no low range, but it had synchronism on the third and fourth gears.[citation needed]
1957 – A 4-door Station Wagon was added as the FJ35V on a 2,650 mm (104.3 in) wheelbase. Land Cruisers were first imported into Australia by B&D Motors as FJ25/28 cab chassis with Australian made bodies.[9] They were the first Japanese cars to be regularly exported to the country[10] and a few were initially used in the Snowy Mountains Hydroelectric Scheme, by sub contractor Theiss Constructions.[11]
1958 – FJ25 production commenced in Brazil; this being the first Toyota vehicle built outside Japan. These were sold as the “Toyota Bandeirante” from January 1962 when the Toyota petrol engine was replaced with a Mercedes-Benz diesel engine. The FJ25 models were buiilt until August 1968 in Brazil.[12] Production numbers were fairly low; in 1965 the total came to 961 vehicles.[13]

Bandeirante timeline

1959:
FJ25 – Short open (topless) bushdrive car – motor Toyota F (May 1959 to 1960/61) – new in 1959 (also referred to as FJ251)
1960/1961:
FJ25L – Short soft top bushdrive car – motor Toyota F (1960/1961 to 1960/1961) – new in 1960/1961 (also referred to as FJ251L)
FJ151L – Short soft top bushdrive car – motor Toyota 2F (1960/1961 to December 1961) – replaces the FJ25/FJ251 and the FJ25L/FJ251L (there are few mentions in literature and no preserved ones known; it could be even doubted if it’s ever been actually built)
1962:
TB25L – Short soft top bushdrive car – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (January 1962 to – 1966?) – replaces the FJ151L (or FJ25L/FJ251L?)
TB25L – Short hard top bushdrive car – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (January 1962 to – 1966?) – new in 1962
TB41L – Long hard top bushdrive car – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (September 1962 to July 1968) – new in 1962
TB51L – Short pickup with native bed – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (September 1962 to January 1966)
1965:
TB51L3 – Short 3-door double cabin pickup with native bed and steel bed cover – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (1965 to ?) – new in 1965; possibly only one unit was built
1966? (between 1962 and 1968):
OJ32L – Short soft top bushdrive car – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (1966? – to August 1968) – replaces the soft top TB25L
OJ31L – Short hard top bushdrive car – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (1966? – to August 1968) – replaces the hard top TB25L
TB81L – Short pickup with native bed – motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (February 1966 to August 1968) – replaces the TB51L

 

 

Toyota Bandeirante
toyota land cruiser J40
Image by amateur photography by michel
Brazillian Toyota Land Cruiser J25 Series

 

Toyota Land Cruiser [J40]
toyota land cruiser J40
Image by junktimers

Toyota Land Cruiser [J40]
toyota land cruiser J40
Image by junktimers

 

J40 (1960–1984)

1960 – The 20 Series was upgraded to the now classic 40. Toyota made many production changes by buying new steel presses. Mechanically, the FJ40 was given a new 93 kW (126 PS; 125 hp), 3.9 L F engine and the Land Cruiser finally received low-range gearing, but continued the three speed main gearbox.
1965 – Global production surpassed 50,000 vehicles.
The Land Cruiser was the best selling Toyota in the United States.
1968 – The 100,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide. Brazilian J40 production, as the Bandeirante, commenced in September. This received a Mercedes-Benz-built diesel engine generating 58 kW (79 PS; 78 hp).
1972 – The 200,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide.
1973 – The 300,000th Land Cruiser was sold worldwide.
The first diesel Land Cruiser was introduced for export on long wheelbase models with a six-cylinder H engine[citation needed].
1974 – A four-cylinder 3.0 L B diesel was offered. The introduction of this engine boosted sales in Japan by putting the Land Cruiser in a lower tax compact freight-car category than its 3.9 L gasoline version. Note: the new B diesel engine was different from the B gasoline engine used in the original BJ.
1975 – The 3.9 L gasoline engine was replaced by a larger, more powerful 4.2 L 2F unit.
The FJ55 received front disc brakes.
The 3.6 L H diesel engine was optional in some markets in the HJ45.[14]
1976 – United States-version FJ40 Land Cruisers received front disc brakes like the FJ55. The Toyota Land Cruiser Association was founded in California.
1977 – The Irish Army took delivery of the first of 77 FJ45 Land Cruisers. Although fast, reliable and with good off-road performance the type tended to rust excessively in the wet Irish climate. A few which did not succumb to the effects of weather were repainted in gloss olive green and survive as ceremonial gun tractors at military funerals.
1978 – The first BJ / FJ40 and FJ55 models were officially sold in West Germany with both diesel (BJ40) and petrol engines (FJ40 /55).
1979 – United States-version FJ40s were updated this year with a new wider, square bezel surrounding the headlights.
Power steering and cooler were offered in FJ40s for the first time The diesel engine was improved, evolving into the 3.2 L 2B only in Japan.
1980 – The H diesel engine (HJ45) was replaced by the 4.0 L 2H engine (now with chassis code HJ47).[14]
1981 – the Diesel version received front disc brakes and the more powerful 3.4 L 3B engine, and added LWB BJ45 with 3B.
1983 – the last FJ40s imported to the U.S. were 1983 models (mid-1982 to mid-1983). It is unknown how many were imported by Toyota, but many guess the number to be around 300. 1983 FJ40s typically bring a premium for their rarity, though they are not much different from 1982 models (mid-1981 to mid-1982).
1984 – the North American market was limited to Canada with the BJ42, which had a 5-speed (overdrive) transmission that was widely sought. Originally around CA$14,000.

 

Toyota Land Cruiser J70
toyota land cruiser J70
Image by junktimers

Toyota Land Cruiser J70
toyota land cruiser J70
Image by junktimers

Toyota Land Cruiser J70
toyota land cruiser J70
Image by junktimers

Toyota Land Cruiser J70
toyota land cruiser J70
Image by junktimers

Toyota Land Cruiser LX [J70]
toyota land cruiser J70
Image by junktimers

J70 (1984–present)

1984 – 70 Series was introduced as a soft-top, hard-top, FRP top, utility, cab-chassis, and Troop Carrier (inward facing rear seats). The petrol engine was replaced with a 4.0 L 3F engine. The 70 Light had a four-wheel coil spring solid-axle suspension for better ride quality. This lighter duty version of the Land Cruiser had the 22R 2.4 L gasoline engine, 2L and 2L-T (turbo) 2.4 L diesel engines commonly found in the Toyota Hilux. The 70 Light was sold in some markets as the Bundera or the Landcruiser II, later called 70 Prado. The 70 Prado eventually became popular and evolved into the 90. An automatic transmission (A440F) was introduced making it the first four-wheel drive Japanese vehicle with an automatic transmission.
1990 – New-generation diesel engines were introduced including a 3.4 L five-cylinder SOHC naturally aspirated motor (1PZ),and a 4.2 L six-cylinder SOHC naturally aspirated motor (1 HZ).
1993 to 1996 – the KZ 3.0 L turbocharged diesel engine replaced the LJ in the 70 series in European markets where this model was known as the KZJ70.
1993 – An advanced 24-valve, 4.5 L six-cylinder petrol engine, 1FZ-FE was introduced.
1999 – Toyota updated the 70 series in several ways. The solid front axle received coil-spring suspension. The rear leaf springs were lengthened for increased ride comfort and wheel travel. The six-bolt wheels were replaced with five-bolt wheels. Several smaller modifications to the drivetrain provided increased durability. The long-wheel-base models received new designations: 78 for the troop carrier, and 79 for the pick-up.
2002 — HDJ79 is introduced to Australia with the 1HD-FTE 4.2 L six-cylinder 24-valve turbodiesel EFI engine.
2007 – Toyota’s first turbodiesel V8 engine, the 1VD-FTV was released in some countries for the 70 Series Land Cruiser. Other modifications include the addition of a 4-door medium-wheel-base model (the 76) and an altered front look on all models.
2012 – Addition of the 79 Double Cab pickup, in South Africa (4.2 L Diesel or 4.0 L Petrol) and Australia (4.5 L V8 Diesel).
The Sixth and Seventh generations of the Land Cruiser are still being produced and sold in African and Latin American regions. Production in Venezuela ended in 2008.
The 70 series is also still marketed in Australia as 4-door wagon, 2-door ‘Troop Carrier’, 2 door cab-chassis and 4 door cab-chassis.
The 2014-15 30th Anniversary Series 70 sold in Japan as a 4-door wagon or 4-door pickup with the 1GR-FE V6 petrol engine and 5 speed manual transmission.

Info Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Land_Cruiser